Sunday, March 6, 2011

Harlow happenings & wrap of the Baby blogathon


"What made her so popular? Well, the face, the figure and the blonde tresses were certainly all a plus factor. Check her out in 1932's Red-Headed Woman and you'll see what a difference the color of hair did make. Other Harlow assets: that spunky 'I hear you knockin' but you can't come in' attitude that she flaunted so deliciously. Another reason people adored her then, as new audiences do today, is because she was a brightly gifted actress and comedienne who despite the tough exterior seemed, at heart, a kind, sensible, immensely likeable human being. Costars and friends such as Myrna Loy and Rosalind Russell certainly thought so. They were among those who, three decades after Harlow's death, were so insulted by a salacious book about their longgone friend that each went on numerous television talk shows with fire in her eyes to repudiate the author's words and defend Harlow's reputation. It takes an extraordinary person to inspire that kind of devotion."

- Robert Osborne on Jean Harlow (more here)

Today is the final day of the Jean Harlow Blogathon, hosted by The Kitty Packard Pictorial. It has been both educational and oh! so much fun going through all of those blog entries about Jean this past week. And there's still more to come so keep your eyes peeled on Carley's amazing blog! Thank you to all of those who have played along here at Harlean's and left such lovely comments. As always, I appreciate each one of your input! Also, don't forget to pick up Harlow in Hollywood: The Blonde Bombshell in the Glamour Capital, 1928-1937, written by Darrell Rooney and Mark A. Vieira. I went around London looking for my copy a couple of days back and was, unfortunately, left empty handed; apparently the book doesn't release in the UK until July! I'd really love to hear thoughts from any of you who were able to pick up the book this week. Please don't hesitate to leave a comment if you've been able to go through this fantastic gem already.

Today I wanted to highlight some very exciting Harlow related happenings. Firstly, as some of you may have heard, the Hollywood Museum, located in the Max Factor Building, is hosting the new Jean Harlow Exhibit. It is guest curated by Darrell Rooney and runs from now through September 5, 2011. The exhibit features Jean's personal and studio related items, such as letters, contracts, autographs, photos, posters and costumes, as well as the infamous Paul Bern/Jean Harlow Mural that once hung in the couple's home. Sadly it seems like I won't be able to visit Los Angeles during the time of the exhibit but I really hope some of you are able to check it out - and, of course, report back with your thoughts!

Also, TCM has named Jean its Star of the Month for March 2011 to celebrate her Baby's Birthday! This means that TCM will show 20 of our Baby's movies each Tuesday night this month, starting next week. What a wonderful treat, especially considering the fact that many of these are still not available on DVD! Read on for the schedule of Harlow films.



Tuesday, March 8

8:00 PM Red-Headed Woman (1932) - An ambitious secretary tries to sleep her way into high society. Cast: Jean Harlow, Chester Morris, Una Merkel. Dir: Jack Conway. BW-80 mins, TV-PG, CC

9:30 PM Three Wise Girls (1932) - Three models try to snag husband's but the ones they find are already married. Cast: Jean Harlow, Mae Clarke, Marie Prevost. Dir: William Beaudine. BW-69 mins, TV-G

10:45 PM Riffraff (1936) - Young marrieds in the fishing business run afoul of the law. Cast: Jean Harlow, Spencer Tracy, Joseph Calleia. Dir: J. Walter Ruben. BW-94 mins, TV-G, CC

12:30 AM Suzy (1936) - A French air ace discovers that his showgirl wife's first husband is still alive. Cast: Jean Harlow, Cary Grant, Franchot Tone. Dir: George Fitzmaurice. BW-93 mins, TV-G, CC

2:15 AM City Lights (1931) - In this silent film, the Little Tramp tries to help a blind flower seller to see again. Cast: Charles Chaplin, Virginia Cherrill, Harry Myers. Dir: Charles Chaplin. BW-87 mins, TV-G


Tuesday, March 15

8:00 PM The Public Enemy (1931) - An Irish-American street punk tries to make it big in the world of organized crime. Cast: James Cagney, Edward Woods, Jean Harlow. Dir: William A. Wellman. BW-84 mins, TV-PG, CC, DVS

9:30 PM Bombshell (1933) - A glamorous film star rebels against the studio, her pushy press agent and a family of hangers-on. Cast: Jean Harlow, Lee Tracy, Frank Morgan. Dir: Victor Fleming. BW-96 mins, TV-G, CC

11:15 PM Libeled Lady (1936) - When an heiress sues a newspaper, the editor hires a reporter to compromise her. Cast: Jean Harlow, Myrna Loy, Spencer Tracy. Dir: Jack Conway. BW-98 mins, TV-G, CC, DVS

1:00 AM Reckless (1935) - A theatrical star gets in over her head when she marries a drunken millionaire. Cast: Jean Harlow, William Powell, Franchot Tone. Dir: Victor Fleming. BW-97 mins, TV-PG, CC

2:45 AM Personal Property (1937) - The bailiff charged with disposing of a financially strapped widow's estate pretends to be her butler. Cast: Jean Harlow, Robert Taylor, Reginald Owen. Dir: W.S. Van Dyke II. BW-84 mins, TV-G

Tuesday, March 22

8:00 PM Wife vs. Secretary (1936) - A secretary becomes so valuable to her boss that it jeopardizes his marriage. Cast: Clark Gable, Myrna Loy, Jean Harlow. Dir: Clarence Brown. BW-88 mins, TV-G, CC

9:45 PM Red Dust (1932) - A plantation overseer in Indochina is torn between a married woman and a lady of the evening. Cast: Clark Gable, Jean Harlow, Mary Astor. Dir: Victor Fleming. BW-83 mins, TV-G, CC

11:15 PM Hold Your Man (1933) - A hard-boiled babe and a con man wear down each other's rough edges. Cast: Jean Harlow, Clark Gable, Stuart Erwin. Dir: Sam Wood. BW-87 mins, TV-PG, CC

1:00 AM China Seas (1935) - A sea captain caught in a romantic triangle has to fight off modern-day pirates. Cast: Clark Gable, Jean Harlow, Wallace Beery. Dir: Tay Garnett. BW-87 mins, TV-G, CC

2:30 AM The Secret Six (1931) - A secret society funds the investigation of a bootlegging gang. Cast: Wallace Beery, Clark Gable, Jean Harlow. Dir: George Hill. BW-84 mins, TV-PG, CC

4:00 AM Saratoga (1937) - A horse breeder's daughter falls for a bookie. Cast: Clark Gable, Jean Harlow, Lionel Barrymore. Dir: Jack Conway. BW-92 mins, TV-G, CC

Tuesday, March 29

8:00 PM Dinner at Eight (1933) - A high-society dinner party masks a hotbed of scandal and intrigue. Cast: Marie Dressler, John Barrymore, Jean Harlow. Dir: George Cukor. BW-111 mins, TV-PG, CC, DVS

10:00 PM The Girl From Missouri (1934) - A gold-digging chorus girl tries to keep her virtue while searching for a rich husband. Cast: Jean Harlow, Franchot Tone, Lionel Barrymore. Dir: Jack Conway. BW-72 mins, TV-PG, CC

11:30 PM Platinum Blonde (1931) - A heartless heiress seduces a hard-working reporter into a disastrous marriage. Cast: Robert Williams, Loretta Young, Jean Harlow. Dir: Frank Capra. BW-89 mins, TV-G

1:15 AM The Beast of the City (1932) - A police captain leads the fight against a vicious gangland chief. Cast: Walter Huston, Jean Harlow, Wallace Ford. Dir: Charles Brabin. BW-86 mins, TV-14, CC

5 comments:

  1. oh I am so frustrated our cable provider doesn't offer TCM!!!! Great little video segment, though. Thanks for sharing!

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  2. BaronessVonVintage - I hear ya! It would such a dream to have TCM, wouldn't it!

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  3. Thanks for sharing that she will be star of the month on TCM: I wasn't aware of that even though I watch it quite a lot. Also: I agree with your comment about the hair. She was very pretty as a red-head, but it was the platinum that really gave her character!

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  4. Liana - No problem, glad to have helped with that! I hope you manage to catch some of the Jean films this month. While I love Harlow as a platinum blonde and it definitely did give her the look and character we most associate with her, I think I personally prefer the look she sported in the last few years of her life with the 'brownette' hairdo.

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  5. Annnnd I did love the red wig on her too! It is such a good wig and looked very natural (unlike in most movies these days).

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